mermaidcomplex:

buffleheadcabin:

tolteka:


Xochipilli represents the concept of enlightened understanding.The best way to do this is through study and observation, in the scientific tradition of our ancestors. Xochipilli is associated with flowers which is a metaphor for poetry, where truth and big ideas are summarized in words and song.  The art of poetry was the highest art form in Mexico Tenochtitlan and all over Anahuac.

Poetry was not just spoken, it was sung.

The idea was that “art made things divine”, and only the divine was true.

There were different kinds of poems, like war songs, moral, and philosophical works.

Nezahualcoyotl (“Fasting Coyote”) of Texcoco is considered a pre-eminent poet-ruler of the 15th century. One of his most famous works describes life as temporary - and beautiful - as flowers.

The theme of “flowers” was regularly used: to symbolize the temporary fragility and beauty of existence.

The poet Cuacuahtzin used this theme of flowers: “I crave flowers that will not perish in my hands! / Where might I find lovely flowers, lovely songs? / Such as I seek, Spring does not produce on earth;”

The Nahuatl expression for poetry was in xochitl, in cuicuatl (“flowers and song”).

[Not to mention the Entheogen connection: It has been suggested by Wasson, Schultes, and Hofmann that the statue of Xochipilli represents a figure in the throes of entheogenic ecstasy. The position and expression of the body, in combination with the very clear representations of hallucinogenic plants which are known to have been used in sacred contexts by the Aztec support this interpretation. Wasson says “He is absorbed in temicxoch, ‘the flowery dream’, as the Nahua say in describing the awesome experience that follows the ingestion of Sinicuichi (Heimia salicifolia). I can think of nothing like it in the long and rich history of European art.”]

I wanted to name my daughter Xochitl but her father protested. So out of spite I protested the name he wanted, the name Caitlin.

One day we were shooting “Portlandia” downtown and we went to eat in the lunchroom of this church where they were having an art show. This season’s shoot was really hard; I felt very pushed and challenged, and I was tired and disoriented a lot. I remember sitting down and seeing this painting on a canvas. It said: “If you can, please wake up.” It’s this weird, dark, intense phrase that almost sounded like something like a kid would say to his parents. And that became my mantra for the whole rest of the shoot.
I spent two weeks chasing down the artist— he was the security guard at the building. I told him how much that painting meant to me and how it had really gotten me through the shoot and he said, “I would be happy to sell it to you if it means that much to you.” So about a month ago, I drove over to his house and bought the painting from him.


Carrie Brownstein
Photographs © We Are The Rhoads
kernel:

Sonríe!

kernel:

Sonríe!

Reblogged from Kernel

varietas:

Herbert List: Mount Lycabettus (Lykabettos). 1937. from the “Spirit of Lycabettus” series /Magnum Photos

givenchyrunway:

Alexander Wang Spring/Summer 2015

givenchyrunway:

Alexander Wang Spring/Summer 2015

Reblogged from hello.
un-expected-art:

Egon Shiele - Mother and Daugther - 1913

un-expected-art:

Egon Shiele - Mother and Daugther - 1913

Reblogged from

styledandwed:

Love this ombre cake via Styled and Wed | Captured by Coralee Stone and styled by Two Foxes Styling & Prop

Reblogged from STYLED & WED

riotinglesbian:

madamecuratrix:

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Jimmy Nelson

Before They Pass Away

Website

The most gorgeous and wonderful photoset that’s come across my dash in a while.

Wow.

THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU, FINALLY, INDIGENOUS LOVE. 

Reblogged from Tell it like it is.
decorativeindulgences:

ca. 1800-75, [Japanese carved wood cicada netsuke]


The netsuke is a toggle. Japanese men used netsuke to suspend various pouches and containers from their sashes by a silk cord. Netsuke had to be small and not too heavy, yet bulky enough to do the job. They needed to be compact with no sharp protruding edges, yet also strong and hard-wearing. Above all, they had to have the means for attaching a cord. Netsuke were made in a variety of forms, the most widely appreciated being the katabori (shape carving), a three-dimensional carving, such as this one in the form of a cicada.
In the early development of katabori netsuke during the 17th century, the influence of China was paramount. The next phase, from around the mid 18th century onwards, reflected a resurgence of native Japanese interests. This manifested itself not only in a preference for Japanese subjects, especially nature, but also in the increasingly naturalistic portrayal of such subjects. This netsuke features an anatomically realistic portrayal of a cicada, complete with details of its underside. The 18th century also saw netsuke carvers increasingly signing their work. This example is signed Harumitsu.

via the Victoria & Albert Museum, Far Eastern Collection

decorativeindulgences:

ca. 1800-75, [Japanese carved wood cicada netsuke]

The netsuke is a toggle. Japanese men used netsuke to suspend various pouches and containers from their sashes by a silk cord. Netsuke had to be small and not too heavy, yet bulky enough to do the job. They needed to be compact with no sharp protruding edges, yet also strong and hard-wearing. Above all, they had to have the means for attaching a cord. Netsuke were made in a variety of forms, the most widely appreciated being the katabori (shape carving), a three-dimensional carving, such as this one in the form of a cicada.

In the early development of katabori netsuke during the 17th century, the influence of China was paramount. The next phase, from around the mid 18th century onwards, reflected a resurgence of native Japanese interests. This manifested itself not only in a preference for Japanese subjects, especially nature, but also in the increasingly naturalistic portrayal of such subjects. This netsuke features an anatomically realistic portrayal of a cicada, complete with details of its underside. The 18th century also saw netsuke carvers increasingly signing their work. This example is signed Harumitsu.

via the Victoria & Albert Museum, Far Eastern Collection