artcomesfirst:

One end of the brass knuckle scissor can help move design forward, the other end reminds us it may sometimes be a struggle. Scissors gifted by@ruraltailor & 📷 by @marc_haers

artcomesfirst:

One end of the brass knuckle scissor can help move design forward, the other end reminds us it may sometimes be a struggle. Scissors gifted by@ruraltailor & 📷 by @marc_haers

Reblogged from Tim McFarlane
My only regret is that
I didn’t tell enough people
to fuck off.
— My 92 year old grandma. (via coffeestainedheart)
Reblogged from x
thinkmexican:

#AbolishColumbusDay
via decolonizingmedia


Si

thinkmexican:

#AbolishColumbusDay

via decolonizingmedia

Si

mermaidcomplex:

buffleheadcabin:

tolteka:


Xochipilli represents the concept of enlightened understanding.The best way to do this is through study and observation, in the scientific tradition of our ancestors. Xochipilli is associated with flowers which is a metaphor for poetry, where truth and big ideas are summarized in words and song.  The art of poetry was the highest art form in Mexico Tenochtitlan and all over Anahuac.

Poetry was not just spoken, it was sung.

The idea was that “art made things divine”, and only the divine was true.

There were different kinds of poems, like war songs, moral, and philosophical works.

Nezahualcoyotl (“Fasting Coyote”) of Texcoco is considered a pre-eminent poet-ruler of the 15th century. One of his most famous works describes life as temporary - and beautiful - as flowers.

The theme of “flowers” was regularly used: to symbolize the temporary fragility and beauty of existence.

The poet Cuacuahtzin used this theme of flowers: “I crave flowers that will not perish in my hands! / Where might I find lovely flowers, lovely songs? / Such as I seek, Spring does not produce on earth;”

The Nahuatl expression for poetry was in xochitl, in cuicuatl (“flowers and song”).

[Not to mention the Entheogen connection: It has been suggested by Wasson, Schultes, and Hofmann that the statue of Xochipilli represents a figure in the throes of entheogenic ecstasy. The position and expression of the body, in combination with the very clear representations of hallucinogenic plants which are known to have been used in sacred contexts by the Aztec support this interpretation. Wasson says “He is absorbed in temicxoch, ‘the flowery dream’, as the Nahua say in describing the awesome experience that follows the ingestion of Sinicuichi (Heimia salicifolia). I can think of nothing like it in the long and rich history of European art.”]

I wanted to name my daughter Xochitl but her father protested. So out of spite I protested the name he wanted, the name Caitlin.